Western union scams dating sites

Lilo Schuster was in her mid-40s, single, and looking for love.

After years of bad luck with dating, she, like millions of people across the globe, started using online dating sites to meet new people. Air Force pilot deployed to fight the Taliban in Afghanistan.

He said there was no way that his dudes would talk for less than 0. So I offered 0 for a rare glimpse at the human faces behind the syntax-challenged spam. I sat down with Sheye and Danjuma* on the back patio of a fancy duplex in an upscale neighborhood in one of the country’s main cities, and the two dished on their craft, constantly interrupting each other as they downed bottles of Nigerian Star lager and chain-smoked.

They pretend to be the foreign specialists working in Nigeria or Ghana (usually originally from US and UK, but it may also be Canada, Australia or any other European country).

They called these cons “Yahoo” jobs, pronounced Ya-OO.

“We go on the internet…We start making friend with you,” Danjuma says, explaining that they trawl Facebook and dating websites incessantly, looking for lonely women with money to spare.

Women are usually nurses, models, charity or UNICEF workers or antique dealers.

After they establish some lovely correspondence with you, fall in love and maybe even send a couple of cheap presents, they will either: a) be almost on their way to meet you, but something will happen to them: they will get robbed, beaten, get into the hospital, or other misfortune will happen and of course you will be their only contact to ask for financial help, or: b) tell you that their employer pays them with Money Orders or checks, and they can't cash them in Nigeria.

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